Available for
All Ages and
All Stages
of Illness

Relieving
Pain, Stress
and Difficult
Symptoms

Supporting
the
Seriously Ill

Supporting
Caregiving
Families

Releasing
Energy for
Favorite
Activities

Check out our E-library for family caregivers

Difficult Symptoms

From managing pain to nausea, constipation, depression and anxiety

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Emotional Spiritual Issues

Finding the balance between grief and hope. Coming to terms with spirituality and family discord

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Living with Serious Illness

Day-to-day tips and insights for living well with cancer, chf, copd and dementia

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Important Decisions

Guidance for critical conversations about quality of life and desired treatments

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Contact Us

At [Your Organization] we work with you and your doctor to create an extra layer of support designed to relieve any pain or discomfort caused by your condition, or treatments to cure your condition.

You receive:

  • A care plan to address physical symptoms
  • Emotional and spiritual support
  • Assistance with treatment decisions
  • Education and support for family members

You can continue with your treatments.
We work with you no matter your age, or your stage of illness. Our job is to address your quality of life and keep you comfortable in body, mind, heart and spirit so you can live life to its fullest.

If you would like a partner in care
Give us a call at [Your Phone Number]

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Too many pills: When less is more

Too many pills: When less is more

More than half of older adults take five or more medications per day. That’s “polypharmacy,” and can be dangerous. Taking too many medicines can cause problems such as dizziness, mental confusion, and heart failure. It can create an increased risk of falls, which often lead to the end of independent living. An estimated 10% to 30% of older adult hospitalizations are due to medication problems.

Managing emotional outbursts

Managing emotional outbursts

If the person you care for has Alzheimer’s disease or another type of dementia, you may find their sudden emotional swings more difficult than their forgetfulness. Among many things, the disease has taken away their inhibitions. They can become quite irrational. And they are more likely to make a scene in public than they ever would have before their dementia. Family members mention embarrassment as one of the most difficult aspects of caring for their relative.

The "dignity of risk"

The “dignity of risk”

One of the most challenging dilemmas when caring for an aging parent is balancing their preference for independence with your concern for their safety. If you have noticed lapses in cleanliness, meals, bill payment, or other areas, you may be worried that your loved one is not able to safely live alone. They may refuse assistance, however, not recognizing there is a problem.

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